Terry Pratchett

"I would like to die peacefully with Thomas Tallis on my iPod before the disease takes me over and I hope that will not be for quite some time to come, because if I knew that I could die at any time I wanted, then suddenly every day would be as precious as a million pounds," he said in a lecture in 2010.

“If I knew that I could die, I would live. My life, my death, my choice.”

Terry Pratchett is dead. Long live Terry Pratchett. One of the greatest comic philosophers the world has known.

http://www.channel24.co.za/News/International/British-author-Terry-Pratchett-66-dies-20150312

I love his books. He will be missed.

ditto: ditto; ditto!

His books are magic.

I’m one of those rare people that found his comedy funny-i-guess but not giggle worthy.

I think there’s a certain thing about his writing that never resonated with me… and I’ve always wondered exactly what… Since I’m otherwise a huge satire fan. (And from what I did read his works were largely satire).

But, I understand most of the rest of the world thinks he was a comedic genius, and so I commiserate.

Yeah. I read the first Discworld book and didn’t really ‘get it.’ Still, it’s always sad when someone so beloved of many goes.

I never cared much for his work either. But judged by his public pronouncements he was a great soul.

Well, to quote Vonnegut on such things, “he is up in heaven now.” No doubt he’s bringing a bit of levity to the normally rather dour scene of virgins in the service of late suicide bombers… :slight_smile:

I couldn’t quite get the hang of his books either. Which is a bit weird because judging by the wonderful dust jacket designs alone, it is exactly the type of books I’d imagine myself enjoying. Anyway, some of his quotes are certainly entertaining.

Build a man a fire, and he’ll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he’ll be warm for the rest of his life. - Terry Pratchett

Rigil

Parody is my favourite form of satire, partly because of a subtle yet witty underlying ridicule serving as a corrective guide. Pratchett’s Disk World stories abound with it. His books are primarily fun rather than moral guides, though. The parallels between Disk World and reality create a secondary level of humour. Often they are so obscure that it is left up to the reader to wonder if the similarities are intended: Is he having a dig at the Masons here? This is just like Scientology! The postal service, fire brigade, police, churches, society in general, all are portrayed, warts and all. Pratchett was a master of parody.

That’s the thing, I get it, I love parody, I laugh alone in cinemas because no-one else gets the joke. I’ve read parts of his books and noticed the parody straight from the get-go. I just don’t find his brand that… engaging. I dunno, his stuff didn’t do it for me. Let’s call it personal taste and leave it there.

I’ll call it personal taste, but won’t leave it there. :stuck_out_tongue:

The funniest parody I’ve ever seen and probably ever will was called Mystery Science Theater 3000: The movie. It pokes fun at a 1950s sci-fi movie called This Island Earth. Oh, man, did I wet myself multiple times (i.e. spilled my drink in mirth)!

I’m sure it’s just human nature to compare everything else to the best you think you’ve ever had. The entertainment industry ain’t got it easy. :confused:

Rigil

Me neither. I tried reading him on a couple of occasions, but couldn’t get past a few pages without thinking of something better to spend time on. I never understood his popularity. Maybe I am just too senile.